Quick Answer: Can All Pills Be Divided?

Can I open a capsule pill and take it?

When taking a prescription drug, you should never crush a tablet, open a capsule or chew either without first asking the prescribing health care provider or dispensing pharmacist whether it is safe to do so..

Can you cut zinc pills in half?

Do not crush or chew extended-release capsules or tablets. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split extended-release tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so.

Which pills can be split?

Drugs that can be usually be split include Lipitor (atorvastatin), Zocor (simvastatin), Crestor (rosuvastatin), Norvasc (amlodipine), Zestril (lisinopril), Accupril (quinapril), Glucophage (metformin), Synthroid (levothyroxine), Zyprexa (olanzapine), Celexa (citalopram), Paxil (paroxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), …

Can you split a pill that is not scored?

Many pills that can be safely split have a “score”, a line down the middle of the pill, that allows for easier splitting. However, be aware that not all tablets that are scored are safe to split in half, so ask your pharmacist first. On the other hand, some tablets that are not scored can be safely cut in half.

How do you split pills evenly?

Press the tablet with your fingers evenly on each side of the score mark until the pill splits in half. Sometimes this will take a decent amount of pressure. Just make sure that you’re using the tips of your fingers to apply even, steady pressure and it will result in a clean break.

What happens if you cut extended release pill in half?

Time-release, delayed-release and extended-release medication, often indicated by an “XR” next to the name, should never be crushed or broken either. “When you cut a long-acting pill, you can end up making the dose come out much higher and faster, which can be dangerous,” explains Dr.

Why Tablets should not be crushed?

Crushing enteric coated tablets may result in the drug being released too early, destroyed by stomach acid, or irritating the stomach lining. In general, manipulation of enteric coated and extended-release formulations is not, therefore, recommended.

Can slow release tablets be crushed?

Slow-release tablets are generally intended to be swallowed whole. They should not be crushed, split, or chewed. If a slow-release tablet is crushed, split, or chewed, a large amount of the medicine may be released all at once. This could cause serious harm.

Which tablet does not have a split list?

Examples of products flagged as not recommended for splitting include most extended-release tablets, delayed-release (enteric coated) tablets, capsules (powder, sprinkle, and liquid filled), suppositories, transdermal patches, finasteride, and ciprofloxacin.

Can a Tramadol pill be cut in half?

General. Do not cut or crush the extended-release tablet. You should swallow it whole. You can cut or crush the immediate-release tablet.

Can I take half a tablet?

However, splitting is not safe for all pills, so you should always discuss this with your pharmacist or doctor. Pills with special coatings and time-release medications should never be split. In general, most pills for blood pressure, cholesterol, and depression are good candidates to split.

Can unscored tablets be broken?

Splitting unscored tablets is considered “off-label” because each split tablet dose may not have equal drug strength. However, splitting drugs with a long half-life and wide therapeutic index—such as those used to treat chronic asymptomatic conditions like hypertension or dyslipidemia—should pose minimal risk.